JNZTH

ancientpeoples:

Gold heandband with gazelles and a stag 
The Second Intermediate period is a period when the Egyptian throne is ruled by foreigners. This piece is clearly not Egyptian in style and yet it was made in Egypt. 
Egyptian, Second Intermediate Period, dynasty 15, 1648 - 1550 BC. 
Probably from the Eastern Delta region. 
Source: metropolitan Museum

ancientpeoples:

Gold heandband with gazelles and a stag 

The Second Intermediate period is a period when the Egyptian throne is ruled by foreigners. This piece is clearly not Egyptian in style and yet it was made in Egypt. 

Egyptian, Second Intermediate Period, dynasty 15, 1648 - 1550 BC. 

Probably from the Eastern Delta region. 

Source: metropolitan Museum

(via virtual-artifacts)

medieval:

St. Luke
The Book of Deer (Evangelia) is a Gospel Book written in a hand that was current in the period c. 850-1000 and generally dated to the first half of the tenth century.

via

medieval:

St. Luke

The Book of Deer (Evangelia) is a Gospel Book written in a hand that was current in the period c. 850-1000 and generally dated to the first half of the tenth century.

via

shoobedoowop:

Seriously underrated animals: Yellow Throated Marten.

The yellow-throated marten is a diurnal hunter, which usually hunts in pairs, but may also hunt in packs of three or more. It preys on rats, mice, hares, snakes, lizards, eggs and ground nesting birds such as pheasants and francolins. It is reported to kill cats and poultry. It has been known to feed on human corpses, and was once thought to be able to attack an unarmed man in groups of 3-4.[3] The yellow-throated marten may prey on small ungulates.[4] In the Himalayas and Burma, it is reported to frequently kill muntjac fawns,[3] while in Ussuriland the base of its diet consists of musk deer, particularly in winter. The young of larger ungulate species are also taken, but within a weight range of 10–12 kg. In winter, the yellow-throated marten hunts musk deer by driving them onto ice. Two or three yellow-throated martens can consume a musk deer carcass in 2–3 days. Other ungulate species preyed upon by the yellow-throated marten include young wapiti, spotted deer, roe deer and goral.[4][5]Wild boar piglets are also taken on occasion.[5] It may prey on panda cubs[13] and smaller marten species, such as sables.[4] In areas where it is sympatric with tigers, the yellow throated marten may trail them and feed on their kills.[5] Like other martens, it supplements its diet with nectar and fruit,[3] and is therefore considered to be an important seed disperser.[14]

(via leradr)